Our Knowledge

Menoken Farm

Resource Database

Learn more about soil health principles through our ever expanding database of educational articles and videos.  Be sure to leave a comment and engage in the discussion.

FEATURED ARTICLE

Worm Juice

Worm Juice

Composting technique jump-starts soil biology Originally published at Deere.com By Dean Houghton I’ve always felt sorry for little Jack Spriggins, the young man who traded his mother’s cow for three magic beans in the famous fable Jack and the Beanstalk. I’m the kind...

read more

LATEST ARTICLES

60-Inch Corn &Cover Crops

60-Inch Corn &Cover Crops

What: 60-Inch Corn & Cover Crops Where: Menoken Farm-Burleigh County Soil Conservation District When: May 2020 Why: Provide crop diversity and enhance sunlight harvest 60-inch corn rows provide the window of opportunity for additional plant diversity and...

read more
Fifteen Inch Spring Wheat

Fifteen Inch Spring Wheat

What: 15-Inch Spring Wheat Where: Menoken Farm-Burleigh County Soil Conservation District When: May 2020 Why: Providing crop diversity with a biennial cover crop. Rethinking spring wheat production in the Northern Plains. A broadleaf biennial cover crop, such as sweet...

read more
Rain Barrels

Rain Barrels

CONSERVATION... Our Purpose. Our Passion. What is a Rain Barrel? A rain barrel is a catchment system designed to store rain water running off a roof, usually attached to a downspout. Benefits of using a rain barrel: Help lower water costs. A rain barrel can save an...

read more
Unearthing soil’s benefits from cover crops

Unearthing soil’s benefits from cover crops

Cover crops are receiving a lot of attention by nearly everyone involved in agriculture. They are once again becoming a very versatile tool that can provide many ecosystem services while also improving a producer’s bottom line.

Cover crops are loosely defined as something planted to serve a multitude of purposes while not typically being harvested as a cash crop. One purpose that is universal to any cover crop is that it can benefit the soil. Since most of the important functions the soil performs (nutrient cycling, as well as water capture and storage, in particular) are biologically driven, cover crops can facilitate an increase in soil health in a big way.

read more